THINGS TO THINK ABOUT WHEN LACING GLOVES

I’m always happy to assist a fellow glove enthusiast.  There are hundreds of informative videos on youtube that can help you get started.  Additionally, there are several lace kits for sale which provide the basic tools you’ll need to do the work available online.  Rawlings, Wilson and Markwort at competitive inexpensive prices.  I sell a professional quality kit for $77 plus S&H at https://www.glovedoctor.com/product-page/john-golomb-professional-baseball-glove-re-lace-kit.  My kit consists of made in the North America items so the cost is high, but  I back the quality 100%.  

 

Just a few things I can share with you from my experience.  First, glove lace is best made in Alum tanning.  Most of the laces for sale today are only available in chrome tanning.  Chrome laces are not bad and they are usually soft and flexible.  However, Alum tanned laces are stiffer but traditional for quality work. Only laces in natural tan are available in Alum for gloves today. Second,  you will find thousands of different ways and patterns for properly repairing gloves since there are thousands of different kinds and models out there.  I have found that when I get a glove to replicate the same lace configuration of any model I start by untying the end then pull out the old lace carefully noting the path it takes. Third, you’ll need at least these tools to begin with. The most important tool I use is the needle nose plier. These pliers are essential for pulling laces old and new. The best lacing tool is the wood handle needle, which I found works effectively for almost all lacing situations . The small locking’ needle is good for eyelets and small holes. Last, quality work is an acquired craft taking years of experience, trial and error. 

I'll try to assist you with any question or issue.  Write me at johngolomb@glovedoctor.com

John Golomb

200 N Wynnewood Ave. A407

Wynnewood, PA 19096-1430

glovedr@aol.com   646-504-3358

copyright john Golomb 2020